ABQLA Conference Report Back

It’s been a very busy academic year, and I hadn’t been able to make regular blog posts. I do want to mention the ABQLA conference I attended earlier in May. 

This past May, I was able to present at the l’Association des bibliothécaires du Québec – Quebec Library Association (ABQLA) 85th annual conference, held at the Loyola campus of Concordia University. I presented on my work making the City Tech Library website more accessible using the WAVE tool. 

ABQLA President Julian Taylor started the conference of by recognizing that the Loyola campus was on First Nation ground. I was surprised to hear this reverence given and was quite pleased that it was said. Maybe the states could follow such an example? 

The Emergence of the Chief.
The Emergence of the Chief.

I was impressed by many of the speakers of the conference. Cynthia Orozco opened the keynote, explaining her work on LIS microaggressions. She explained her personal journey as a librarian as well as the many of the hardships that librarian people of color experience throughout the creation of the LIS microaggression zine. She also provided many strategies that librarians can employ to empower themselves, their institution, their patrons, and their communities. Her must see presentation was enlightening and inspiring.

Michelle Maloney of the University of the Pacific gave an excellent talk about her experience working with first-generation students. She discussed how her library worked closely with their writing center to prepare incoming freshman.

Amy Jo Mitchell and Kristine Nowak gave an excellent talk about a custom library classification system for a LGBTQ center in my home state of Kentucky. Located in Lexington, the center has a library, and Nowak and Mitchell discussed how the Library of Congress classification system needs an update on LGBTQ subject headings. The headings are outdated and the Pride Community Services Organization needed a system that was more flexible for it’s patrons.

The library at the Pride Resource Community Services Organization in Lexington, KY.
The library at the Pride Community Services Organization in Lexington, Ky.

The last session I attended was an organization update on ABQLA. I found it fascinating how the Canadian library groups work independently from one another after the dissolution of the Canada Library Association. I also learned that Fair Dealing is the terminology used instead of Fair Use.

Fair Dealing in Canada

The ending keynote was presented by Marcelle Kosman, Co-host of the Podcast, Witch Please. She discussed her doctoral research into women Canadian sci-fi writers, and how a lot of those works were republished and modeled from American pulp fiction magazines. As a sci-fi reader, I found her end note fascinating. 

Kosman's explained that early Canadian women sci-fi writers used white-supremacy in a number of stories, which comparable to young Dumbledore's flirtation with fascism. 
Kosman’s explained that early Canadian women sci-fi writers used white-supremacy in a number of stories, which comparable to young Dumbledore’s flirtation with fascism. 

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